BREAKING NEWS: Pour Moi named to
TIME Best Inventions of 2020 List
SPECIAL TV OFFER
Utah / Twin Cities / Houston / Palm Springs / Milwaukee / Vegas / Seattle / ALL CITIES
Cold + dry weather

Cold + dry weather

Polar climate

WHAT EXACTLY CHANGES IN THE SKIN: Your skin struggles in cold weather. Chilly temperatures force the skin’s blood vessels to constantly change their behavior. They expand and constrict to manage the trade-off between driving warm blood to the organs and keeping the skin supplied. Your body eventually reduces blood flow to your skin when temperatures drop below 45⁰F.  Once this happens, skin’s vessels dilate and stretch wider, so they can be more efficient. This is why your face often looks red in polar conditions.

Some blood vessels stretch out beyond their usual capability.  This is known as broken capillaries and happens when suddenly going from the cold to overheated rooms and vice versa. In addition to the cold outside and overheated rooms, the lack of humidity in the air accelerates Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). Even when the sun is not visible, UV light is still present and so is pollution, creating free radicals in your skin, accelerating external aging and barrier dysfunction.

Hot + Humid weather

Hot + Humid weather

Tropical climate

WHAT EXACTLY CHANGES IN THE SKIN: A lot— when it’s hot, your skin’s job is to help cool your body. Excess heat from inside the body is released by expanding blood vessels closer to the skin’s surface (that’s why you look rosy and flushed when it’s very hot). Sweat glands start perspiration (sweating) bringing water to the surface to further cool you down- the tradeoff cost to your skin is access TEWL (TransEpidermal Water Loss) from inside your skin. Unfortunately, skin’s natural cooling process doesn’t work well in high humidity. The heavy, wet air prevents sweat from easily escaping off your skin, trapping heat, wetness (and everything flowing in the wet air) onto your skin. (That’s why 85 degree in a tropical climate feels more like 95 degrees)

When skin releases heat, the natural skin lipids turn from waxy into oily. Mixed with trapped sweat, your pores get easily clogged and inflammation starts. Intense and strong UV light and pollution attack barrier functions and skin cell health.

HOT + Dry Weather

HOT + Dry Weather

Desert climate

WHAT EXACTLY CHANGES IN THE SKIN: The drier the air, the more moisture it sucks from your skin. This naturally occurring process is called Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL) and it’s the natural state of skin in the desert (yes…your skin appears to age faster in the desert). Contrary to a humid climate where the loss of water is replaced by water from the humid air, in the desert your skin pulls water from inside (the dermis) by increasing its Natural Moisturizing Factor (NMF). Unfortunately, at most, skin can only pull about a third of the water it needs. But, when it comes to cooling down your body, skin manages the heat in the desert well. Perspiration (sweat) dries so quickly in the dry  air that you don’t even notice sweating ever started. This is why 80⁰F in a dry climate feels more like 70⁰F or less.

Strong UV light and pollution, heightened in this extreme climate, create free radicals in the skin, leading to inflammation and barrier dysfunction.

MILD + comfortable weather

MILD + comfortable weather

Temperate climate

WHAT EXACTLY CHANGES IN THE SKIN:  You know it’s temperate weather when it’s the same temperature inside as it is outside with no help from heating or air-conditioning. Temperate weather is the one and only skin-loving climate. In mild weather when humidity and temperatures are average, your skin is relaxed and clinical studies have confirmed, your skin functions at ease.

In light spring and fall weather, mild winter days and cool summer days, your skin actually benefits from the atmosphere. Your skin’s Natural Moisturizing Factor (NMF) draws in the optimal amount of atmospheric water for your skin to stay naturally moist and balanced. Skin’s barrier functions are less challenged by pollution and UV light because UV index is lower than in extreme climates. Yet, they still exist and contribute to free radical damage.

HIGH ALTITUDE + Arid air

HIGH ALTITUDE + Arid air

Mountain & high desert climate

The higher the altitude, the more your skin struggles to stay naturally hydrated and flexible. Once you’re higher than 2,000 ft elevation, the most outer layers of the epidermis can’t hold on to hydration for even a short period of time: Air is too thin, caused by low air pressure. When air pressure is low, water molecules in the air spread out too much for your skin to hold on. Even regular moisturizers can’t stay in your skin for long. Mountain and high desert climate is the most damaging climate for your skin.

UV light intensity goes up by 20% for every 1,000 ft in elevation and without special care, skin shows signs of dryness, loss of firmness, & premature aging such as fine lines & wrinkles.

COOL & rainy/overcast weather

COOL & rainy/overcast weather

Marine climate

WHAT EXACTLY CHANGES IN THE SKIN: Cool temperature combined with high humidity (hello rainy season!) can cause your skin to feel greasy while dry at the same time.  This is caused by the humidity congesting your pores while lower temperatures prompt the skin to decrease its natural oil production, dehydrating the lower layers of your complexion. Often the NMF gets out of balance and that’s when not only your skin’s moisture balance is off but also its barrier functions can be compromised resulting in increased skin sensitivity as microbes and allergens now have a path of entry into the skin.

Marine climate is characterized by overcast skies often giving you a wrong sense of protection from harmful UV light. Because marine climate is typically close to large bodies of water, UV light exposure is even stronger as it is reflected by the water. On the other hand, the “good part” of sunlight that’s responsible for producing vitamin D in skin is hidden by the clouds.